Remarks on the comparative merits of cast metal and malleable iron rail-ways; and an account of the Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way, &c. &c. Newcastle: Printed by Edward Walker, 1827. WITH: An account of the Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way; and extracts from the Report of the Committee to the proprietors, at their annual meeting, held at Yarm, on Tuesday, the 10th day of July, 1827. N. p., n. d. WITH: ADAMSON, James. Sketches of our information as to rail-roads.

By: Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way.

Price: $1,200.00

Quantity: 1 available


Three parts in one volume (signatures consecutive). Small 4to. 22; 39, [1 blank]; 26 pp. 3 engraved plates, table; lightly foxed, discrete pencil marginalia on two pages, offsetting at pages 20-21 of first work. Contemporary quarter cloth, boards. Bookplate of Thomas Longridge Gooch with his signature on title. Fine. FIRST EDITION. A Railroad Engineering Milestone. The first two plates in this volume depict the Bedlington Ironworks, Durham, where John Birkinshaw received a patent in 1820 to produce improved rolled rails. Birkinshaw's rails were wedge-shaped and much wider at the top than at the bottom, and he recommended that they should be made 18 feet long. They were supported on sleepers by chairs at intervals of 3 feet, and were fish-bellied between the points of support. George Stephenson (1871-1848) used these rails on the Stockton and Darlington line, the major subject of this work. Stephenson's studies suggested that railways must be specially designed with the object of avoiding changes of gradient as much as possible. Cuttings, tunnels, and embankments were essential, and are illustrated in this work. On April 19, 1821 Parliament approved the project of connecting Stockton and Darlington by a tram road. Stephenson was employed as engineer, surveyed the entire line, and obtained a new route in 1823. The first rail was laid on May 23, 1823, with Stephenson strongly advocating the use of malleable-iron rails. Stephenson was instrumental in establishing a locomotive works at Newcastle to provide the staff and training for the construction of locomotives to be used on the line. THE LINE WAS OPENED FOR TRAFFIC ON SEPTEMBER 27, 1825, AMID A SCENE OF GREAT ENTHUSIASM DEPICTED IN THIS VOLUME IN A WONDERFUL LARGE FOLDING PLATE. The first locomotive that passed over it weight eight tons and attained a speed of twelve to sixteen miles an hour. It now occupies a pedestal at Darlington station. DNB, XVIII, p. 1072; Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th ed., XXII, p. 819; Smiles, The life of George Stephenson, pp. 153-208. First Edition.

Title: Remarks on the comparative merits of cast metal and malleable iron rail-ways; and an account of the Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way, &c. &c. Newcastle: Printed by Edward Walker, 1827. WITH: An account of the Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way; and extracts from the Report of the Committee to the proprietors, at their annual meeting, held at Yarm, on Tuesday, the 10th day of July, 1827. N. p., n. d. WITH: ADAMSON, James. Sketches of our information as to rail-roads.

Author Name: Stockton and Darlington Rail-Way.

Categories: Railroad,

Publisher: Newcastle:, Printed by Edward Walker, n. d.:

lbs: 3.00 lbs

Seller ID: S6558

Keywords: Railroad