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Anesthesia

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Leçons sur les anesthesiques et sur l'asphyxie., BERNARD, Claude (1813-1878).
1 BERNARD, Claude (1813-1878). Leçons sur les anesthesiques et sur l'asphyxie.
Paris: J.-B. Baillière et fils, 1875. 1875 
Series: Cours de Medecine du Collège de France. 8vo. vii, 536 pp. 7 text figs. Modern quarter black morocco over marbled boards, raised bands gilt-stamped spine title, original paper wrappers bound in. Bookplate of Andras Gedeon. Fine. FIRST EDITION. ?This monograph is a landmark in the history of the development of anesthesia, for Bernard did some basic work on the physiological effects of anesthetic drugs, pointed out the dangers of such drugs, and advocated the use of pre-anesthetic depressants such as morphine.? [Heirs of Hippocrates]. ?As early as 1864 Bernard discovered that chloroform anesthesia could be prolonged and intensified by the injection of morphine.? [Garrison & Morton]. References: Duncum, The Development of Inhalation Anaesthesia, with Special Reference to the Years 1846-1900, pp. 379-80; Fulton & Stanton VIII, 2; Garrison & Morton 5673; Gedeon, Science and technology in medicine, #47.8 (pp. 249-50); Heirs of Hippocrates 1798; Norman 208; Waller 959. First Edition. 
Price: 700.00 USD
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2 BERNARD, Claude (1813-1878). Leçons sur les Anesthesiques et sur l'Asphyxie.
Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1875. 1875 
8vo. vii, 536 pp. Illustrations. Quarter brown morocco with marbled boards, gilt-stamped spine title with raised bands, original printed wrappers bound in. Fine. FIRST EDITION. A very nice copy. ?It was Magendie's illustrious pupil, Claude Bernard, however, to whom we are indebted for basic work in this field. Bernard, realizing that the successful practice of medicine must be based on sound physiological principles, carried his research into all possible lines. It was his good fortune to be working at the time that anesthesia had become accepted as a necessary and a desirable part of the practice of surgery… Bernard tried hard to place anesthesiology on a scientific basis and his monograph can be considered a landmark.? [Keys]. ?This monograph is a landmark in the history of the development of anesthesia, for Bernard did some basic work on the physiological effects of anesthetic drugs, pointed out the dangers of such drugs, and advocated the use of pre-anesthetic depressants such as morphine.? [Heirs of Hippocrates]. GM 5673; Heirs of Hippocrates No. 1798; Keys, History of Surgical Anesthesia, p. 71; Waller 959. First Edition. 
Price: 500.00 USD
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"Anæsthetic Agents, Their Mode of Exhibition and Physiological Effects," [Extracted from the Transactions of the Am. Med. Ass., Vol. I.]., BIGELOW, Henry Jacob (1818-1890).
3 BIGELOW, Henry Jacob (1818-1890). "Anæsthetic Agents, Their Mode of Exhibition and Physiological Effects," [Extracted from the Transactions of the Am. Med. Ass., Vol. I.].
[Philadelphia]: American Medical Association, [1847/8]. 1847 
Offprint. Series: Transactions of the American Medical Association. Sm. 8vo. 18 pp. Contemporary plain brown wrappers, probably as issued; extracted from a bound volume, thus a remnant residue affecting spine. Front cover library withdrawal rubber stamp [possibly: "Concord Free Public Library"]. Very good. First SEPARATE OF BIGELOW ON ANESTHESIA, the journal form has an entirely different pagination, being pages 197-214 in the 1847 issue. We believe this is the original offprint form of this paper by Bigelow. There are several clear differences between this offprint form and the journal issue is (1) the pagination for the offprint is 1-18 (for the journal it is 197-214), and (2), the journal issue has "C.-1. at the head of the paper, and foot of the page has no page number – whereas the offprint form adds the line "[Extracted…], raises the title text higher on the page and includes a page number "1" at the bottom left margin. There is no known textual difference. "The committee considered in detail the various anesthetic agents. According to the report, some surgeons were afraid to use anesthesia in their surgical operations, feeling that the advantages afforded by the relief of pain might be offset by the risks involved. [However,] even at this early date, authors of this report felt that a large group of surgeons were wholly in favor of anesthesia. The authors did, however, admit that some surgeons would restrict the use of these agents to severe operations, after the introduction of ether anesthesia in Boston it was not until several months later that the method became generally popular in other communities in the United States. The favorable reports of its use in Boston and in Europe made for the more extensive use in American communities in 1847 and 1848. The dangers of etherization were also considered. In some cases it was thought that convulsions, prolonged stupor, intense cerebral excitement, alarming depression of the vital powers and asphyxia apparently were caused by the inhalation of ether and chloroform. Secondary effects attributed to inhalation in a few cases were bronchitis, pneumonia and inflammation of the brain. Interestingly enough, according to this report (p. 190), ether was considered to be a safer drug than chloroform" (Keys, pp. 36-47). "Dr. Bigelow was the unflinching advocate of sulphuric ether as the only safe anesthetic: and his unshaken opinion had a very wide and lasting influence. Bigelow instituted important and productive experiments in anesthesia. He inhaled new and untried anesthetic agents. He made practical and original studies of asphyxia, and thoroughly established the fact that insensibility from the inhalation of nitrous oxide gas is largely due to asphyxia. He was also the first to show that anesthesia by nitrous oxide could be accomplished with certainty only by the use of a large volume of gas; and thus made the way plain to Colton and others for its successful adoption in tooth-pulling, and in brief surgical operations" (Mayo, p. 603). Bigelow (1818–1890), born in Boston, studied at Harvard from 1833, and became a prominent surgeon and Professor of Surgery at Harvard University. "His 1846 article, 'Insensibility during Surgical Operations Produced by Inhalation? detailed the discovery of ether anesthesia and was selected by readers of the New England Journal of Medicine as the 'most important article in NEJM history? in commemoration of the journal's 200th anniversary." "He was a vocal opponent of vivisection and was best known for his description of the hip joint and for a technique for treating patients with kidney stones." – Wikip. REFERENCES: Keys, Thomas, The History of Surgical Anesthesia, Park Ridge, IL: Wood Library Museum of Anesthesiology, 1996; Fulton & Stanton, Anesthesia, VII, p. 191; Mayo, William J. "In the Time of Henry Jacob Bigelow." JAMA, Vol. 77, No. 8. 1921. 597-603 pp. 
Price: 2000.00 USD
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4 BIGELOW, Henry Jacob (1818-1890). Anaesthetic Agents, their Mode of Exhibition and Physiological Effects. Contained in: Transactions of the American Medical Association, Vol. I, pp. 197-214, 1847.
[New York?]: American Medical Association, 1847 1847 
8vo. 403 pp. 5 engraved plates (2 colored); badly water-stained throughout. Original printed paper wrappers; water-stained, neatly re-backed. Book-label of Haskell F. Norman. Good. RARE. The first volume of the Transactions of the American Medical Association, very much concerned with the medical breakthrough of anesthetics. Bigelow's paper is just one in the Report of the Committee on Surgery (pp. 159-224) containing an introduction and six different sections. ?The committee considered in detail the various anesthetic agents. According to the report, some surgeons were afraid to use anesthesia in their surgical operations, feeling that the advantages afforded by the relief of pain might be offset by the risks involved [however] even at this early date, authors of this report felt that a large group of surgeons were wholly in favor of anesthesia. The authors did, however, admit that some surgeons would restrict the use of these agents to severe operations, after the introduction of ether anesthesia in Boston it was not until several months later that the method became generally popular in other communities in the United States. The favorable reports of its use in Boston and in Europe made for the more extensive use in American communities in 1847 and 1848. The dangers of etherization were also considered. In some cases it was thought that convulsions, prolonged stupor, intense cerebral excitement, alarming depression of the vital powers and asphyxia apparently were caused by the inhalation of ether and chloroform. Secondary effects attributed to inhalation in a few cases were bronchitis, pneumonia and inflammation of the brain. Interestingly enough, according to this report (p. 190), ether was considered to be a safer drug than chloroform.? [Keys]. Keys, pp. 36-37; Fulton & Stanton, Anesthesia, VII, p. 191. 
Price: 1700.00 USD
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5 Boston Society for Medical Improvement; R. M. HODGES; George HAYWARD; S. D. TOWNSEND; C. T. JACKSON; J. Baxter UPHAM. Report of a Committee of the Boston Society for Medical Improvement, on the Alleged Dangers which Accompany the Inhalation of the Vapor of Sulphuric Ether.
Boston: David Clapp, 1861. 1861 
8vo. 36 pp. Original printed wrappers; creased, top right corner chipped, spine wear. Very good. FIRST EDITION. "When, some time since, we had occasion to allude to the fact that ether had proved fatal in a number of instances, the announcement was received with much surprise, and more than one incredulous correspondent was moved to inquire on what authority the statement was made. The authority was given, and reference was made to twenty-five cases that up to that time had been reported. The Boston Society for Medical Improvement soon after appointed a committee to report 'on the alleged dangers which accompany the inhalation of the vapor of sulphuric ether,? and recently this committee discharged their obligations in a lengthy and very elaborate report. That they have had 'unequalled facilities? for collecting material this document bears the most unequivocal evidence; and in this respect it may be considered complete. .The report…consists of two portions, the text and an appendix of forty-one cases of alleged deaths by ether, upon which the conclusions of the committee are based. The profession is under great obligations to the Boston Society for instituting this investigation, and to the committee for the unwearied zeal they have manifested in the collection of evidence upon the subject of their repot" (AMT, p. 308). REFERENCES: "Ether as an Anæsthetic." American Medical Times. Nov. 9, 1861. 308-316 pp. See: John Farquhar Fulton, Madeline Earle Stanton, The Centennial of Surgical Anesthesia. An annotated catalogue of books and pamphlets bearing on the early history of surgical anaesthesia, VII.33. Locations: American Antiquarian Society, UCLA, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. First Edition. 
Price: 700.00 USD
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Report of a Committee of the Boston Society for Medical Improvement, on the Alleged Dangers which Accompany the Inhalation of the Vapor of Sulphuric Ether., Boston Society for Medical Improvement; R. M. HODGES; George HAYWARD; S. D. TOWNSEND; C. T. JACKSON; J. Baxter UPHAM.
6 Boston Society for Medical Improvement; R. M. HODGES; George HAYWARD; S. D. TOWNSEND; C. T. JACKSON; J. Baxter UPHAM. Report of a Committee of the Boston Society for Medical Improvement, on the Alleged Dangers which Accompany the Inhalation of the Vapor of Sulphuric Ether.
Boston: David Clapp, 1861. 1861 
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. 36 pp. Disbound; title-page left edge chipped. Good. Locations: American Antiquarian Society, UCLA, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. First Edition. 
Price: 100.00 USD
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7 KEYS, Thomas E. The History of Surgical Anesthesia ... With Introductory Essay by Chauncey D. Leake. A Concluding Chapter ?The Future of Anaesthesia? by Noel A. Gillespie and an Appendix by John F. Fulton.
New York: Dover, (1963). 1963 Signed
8vo. xxx, 193 pp. Photos, figs., bibliog., index. Pictorial wrappers. INSCRIBED BY AUTHOR, 1963. FINE. Revised and enlarged edition. Garrison and Morton 5732. 
Price: 120.00 USD
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8 KUHN, Franz (1866-1929). Perorale Tubagen mit und ohne Druck." In: Deutsche Zeitschrift für Chirurgie, vol. LXXVI, pp. 148-207.
Leipzig: F.C.W. Vogel, 1905. 1905 
8vo. (225 x 165 mm). v, 592 pp. 5 plates (some with color, one a fold- out), 58 illustrations; fold-out plate has a small tear, image unaffected. Modern half brown cloth with decorative boards, gilt-stamped spine title. Penciled Garrison and Morton citation on front free endpaper. Near fine. FIRST EDITION. "Kuhn introduced the intratracheal insufflation method of anaesthetization about 1900; he used a flexible metal tube and a curved introducer. He also experimented with positive and negative pressure insufflation." [Garrison & Morton]. "[Kuhn] deserves a good deal of credit, for by 1912 his advances in endotracheal anesthesia anticipated the methods employed today." [Keys]. Provenance: Library of the Harvard Medical School (rubber stamp on verso of title). Garrison & Morton 5693; Gedeon, pp. 295, 297; Keys, The History of Surgical Anesthesia, p. 67. First Edition. 
Price: 900.00 USD
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9 LUDOVICI, L. J. Cone of Oblivion. A Vendetta in Science.
London: Max Parrish, (1961). 1961 
8vo. 224 pp. Bibliog. Boards, dust jacket; jacket extremities slightly worn, else fine. FIRST EDITION. Study of the central figures involved in the discovery of anesthesia by ether inhalation. Dust jacket present. First Edition. 
Price: 20.00 USD
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10 MacQUITTY, Betty. Victory over pain. Morton's discovery of anaesthesia. With a Foreword by Christiaan Barnard.
New York: Taplinger, (1969). 1969 
8vo. 208 pp. Frontis., bibliog., index; remainder mark on lower edge. White cloth, black-stamped spine title, dust jacket. Very good. Dust jacket present. 
Price: 30.00 USD
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11 MacQUITTY, Betty. Victory over pain. Morton's discovery of anaesthesia. With a Foreword by Christiaan Barnard.
New York: Taplinger, (1969). 1969 
8vo. 208 pp. Frontis., bibliog., index. White cloth, black-stamped spine title, dust jacket. Fine. Dust jacket present. 
Price: 40.00 USD
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12 MEHTA, Mark. Intractable pain.
London, etc.: W. B. Saunders, 1973. 1973 
Series: Major Problems in Anaesthesia. FIRST EDITION. 8vo. xiv, 287 pp. Figs., tables, bibliog., index. Gilt-stamped gray cloth. Very good. First Edition. 
Price: 15.00 USD
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13 RICHARDSON, Sir Benjamin Ward (1828-1896). "On the painless extinction of life in the lower animals."
In: Scientific American Supplement, No. 476, (February 14, 1885). 1885 
410 x 288 mm. Folio. 7602-7605 pp. [Entire issue: (7591)-7606 pp.] Illus. Self wraps; paper lightly browned, small stain on top page. Very good. This article contains the text of a lecture given to the Society of Arts, London, December 18, 1884. It provides a short history of the subject "the lethal process", a table of anesthetic gases and vapors showing their chemical properties, and 5 figures illustrating lethal chamber used in the euthanasia of animals. Richardson "spent many years in attempts to relieve pain among men by discovering and adapting substances capable of producing general or local anæsthesis, and among animals by more humane methods of slaughter. He brought into use no less that fourteen anæsthetics, of which methylene bichloride is the best known, and he invented the first double-valved mouthpiece for use in the administration of chloroform. He also produced local insensibility be freezing the part with an ether spray, and he gave animals euthanasia by means of a lethal chamber." DNB, Vol. XXII (Supplement), p. 1170. Sir Benjamin Richardson contributed widely to the history of medicine whose important work, Disciples of Aesculapius, was published in 1900. See: Garrison, History of medicine, p. 885; Garrison and Morton 6721. In addition, this issue of the Scientific American Supplement contains two articles related to anesthesia entitled "The kola-nut," and "Cultivation of the coca plant in the United States," both related the production and use of cocaine as an anesthetic agent. 
Price: 50.00 USD
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14 ROBINSON, Victor Victory Over Pain. A History of Anesthesia
New York: Henry Schuman 1946 hardcover 1 
New York:: Henry Schuman. 1946. hardcover. 1. First edition. 8vo. xiv, 338 pp. Photos, illus., bibliog., index. Black cloth, dust jacket; jacket extremities slightly rubbed. A FINE COPY. Dust jacket present. First Edition. 
Price: 25.00 USD
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15 SIMPSON, James Young (1811-1870). Account of a new anaesthetic agent as a substitute for sulphuric ether in surgery and midwifery.
Edinburgh & London: Sutherland and Knox, & Samuel Highley, 1847. 1847 
Thin 8vo. 23 pp. Modern plain wrappers. Housed in an oversize custom quarter blue morocco portfolio. Bookplate of Andras Gedeon. Fine. SCARCE FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE USE OF CHLOROFORM. The Second Edition, published two or three days after the first. "While searching for an anesthetic less irritating than ether, Simpson discovered the advantages of chloroform, and was the first to apply it as a pain-killer during labor and childbirth. Simpson first used chloroform in an obstetrical case on 8 November 1847, when he administered it to a woman with a previous history of difficult labor; the baby was born without complications about twenty-five minutes after the first inhalation… In spite of Simpson's success with chloroform, he encountered a great deal of opposition from conservative doctors and clergymen, who considered labor pains a God-given punishment for Eve's sins, and he embarked on a long publishing campaign to convert the opposition. His most famous non-scientific argument was that God Himself had been the first anesthetist when He, caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, before bringing forth Eve from his rib. Simpson's efforts were finally accepted by the medical establishment when Queen Victoria chose to take chloroform for the birth of Prince Leopold in 1853." [Norman]. "Simpson, the leading obstetrician of his time and a member of the faculty at the University of Edinburgh, introduced the use of chloroform as an anesthetic after experimenting with ether and finding that it had some undesired side effects. Within weeks of his demonstration in 1847 of the superiority of chloroform, it had almost universally displaced ether as a general anesthetic. Simpson presented the results of his experiences with chloroform to the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Edinburgh at its meeting of November 10, 1847. His findings were published in a pamphlet at Edinburgh later that year... Simpson had observed the use of sulphuric ether in January 1847 and was immediately convinced that similar agents would be found. Concerned about the disadvantages of sulphuric ether, Simpson tried a number of other volatile chemicals and here reports on his successful use of chloroform. He discusses its advantages, chemical properties, and four case histories in which it was employed with great success." [Heirs of Hippocrates]. References: Fulton & Stanton VI, 1; Garrison & Morton 5657 (reprint in The Lancet); Gedeon, Science and technology in medicine, p. 193; Heirs of Hippocrates 1764 (1848 New York reprint); Norman 1945; Osler 1479; Wellcome V, p, 116. First Edition. 
Price: 5500.00 USD
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16 WEIGER, Joseph. Beweise der Unschädlichkeit des Schwefel-Aethers und der Nachtheile des Chloroform's.
Vienna: Carl Gerold & Sohn, 1850. 1850 
8vo. (223 x 143 mm) [8], 136 pp. Original printed wrappers; small piece at top of spine missing. Bookplate of Andras Gedeon. Fine. FIRST EDITION. Weiger gives his reasons for recommending and using ether rather than chloroform for anesthesia and refers to some of the 21,000 dental operations he had completed using anesthetics between 1847 (when he began using it and was an early proponent of its efficacy) until the publication of this monograph. [Crowley]. The work is dedicated to W.T.G. Morton of Boston, a fellow dentist. "The first administration of ether in Vienna was performed by Schuh in 1847. 2 days later also von Wattmann used ether for anaesthesia. Approximately at the same time the nowadays nearly unknown dentist Joseph Weiger began to give ether anaesthesia for dental surgery. He reported in 1850 about his experiences in more than 21,000 operations. A further publication in 1851 gave a survey about the known ether literature." [Panning] Crowley 530; Drudziak, R, Lhb. Anästhesiologie, S206; Engelmann Suppl. 272; Panning, B., Abteilung Anästhesiologie II, Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover, NLM/PubMed; Walser, Einführung des äthernarkose im dt. Sprachgegiet. First Edition. 
Price: 735.00 USD
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17 WOOLMER, Ronald. The Conquest of Pain: Achievements of Modern Anaesthesia.
New York: Alfred Knopf, 1961. 1961 
FIRST EDITION. 8vo. xii, 240, indexes vii pp. 8 plates, 8 figs., indexes. Blue cloth, silver stamped spine title, dust-jacket; jacket with a few chips, but very good. First Edition. 
Price: 4.00 USD
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