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Africa

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1 BAKER, Sir Samuel White (1821-1893). Ismailia, a narrative of the expedition to Central Africa for the suppression of the slave trade, organized by Ismail, Khedive of Egypt. In two volumes.
London: Macmillan, 1874. 1874 
Two volumes. 8vo. viii, 447; viii, 588 pp. Frontis., large folding colored map of "The Albert N'yanza", color map of the Nile, 50 detailed plates illus. by Zwecker and Durand; lightly foxed, folding map with kozo repairs. Later half green buckram over original pictorial gilt covers with gilt on black spine label. Good. Baker, with Speke, helped to locate the sources of the Nile. In March 1864 Baker determined the source to be a lake, which he named Albert Nyanza (Lake Albert), lying between modern Uganda and Congo (Kinshasa). 
Price: 100.00 USD
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2 BAUMONT, Maurice. La Faillite de la Paix (1918-1939). I: De Rethondes � Stresa; II: De l�Affaire Ethiopienne a la Guerre.
Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1951. 
2 volumes. Series: Peuples et Civilisations, XX. Third edition. 8vo. [iv], 531, v; [iv], 533-948, [2] pp. Index. Original printed wrappers. A Beautiful copy. 
Price: 15.00 USD
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3 BOWDICH, Thomas Edward (1791?–1824). Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee, with a statistical account of that kingdom, and geographical notices of other parts of the interior of Africa.
London: John Murray, 1819. 1819 
4to. [iii]-viii, [2], 512 pp. [a1 blank, not present]. Complete with a full set of plates: 2 engraved maps (1 folding frontispiece map: "Discoveries & Improvements in the Geography of Western Africa"), "Arabic Circular," 7 hand-colored aquatint plates (2 folding), wood-engraved "Ichonographical Sketch of Coomassie" [a street map], 2 music sheets (including the 4 page pl.), appendices; some plate offsetting, occasional foxing and stains, three neatly closed tears (gutter of title, plate facing p.275 (upper margin), p. 511-12). Modern gilt-stamped brown half-calf, five raised bands, gilt-stamped light-brown morocco spine label, new endleaves. Very good + in a fine binding. FIRST EDITION. "The work in which he records the results of his Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee (1819) was received with enthusiasm, and his account of a people hitherto unknown and their 'warlike barbaric splendour' excited widespread interest." "In 1815 the African Company planned a mission to the Asante, and initially contemplated appointing Bowdich to lead it. On reaching Cape Coast Castle the second time, he was judged too young and Frederick James (governor of Fort Accra) was appointed to lead the expedition. In the course of the journey, however, Bowdich superseded his chief (a bold step afterwards sanctioned by the authorities), and, through negotiations which subsequently proved controversial, formed a treaty with the king of the Asante, which promised peace to the British settlements on the Gold Coast in return for commercial and political co-operation. In 1818 he returned to England in poor health, and in the following year published a detailed account of his expedition, A Mission from Cape Coast Castle to Ashantee. This work, with its glowing account of Asante society and culture, attracted considerable interest. Bowdich presented a small collection of African objects and specimens to the British Museum." – Oxford DNB. The Appendices offer: I) Extract from Governor Henry Meredith's account of the Gold Coast, including the origin and history of the Ashantee War (The Colonial Journal, London, vol. 1, Jan.-July, 1816, relates his tragic death, pp. 102-3); II) Translations of a manuscript descriptive of Mungo Park's death (related by Salame and Jackson); III) Routes are recorded, as well are dictionaries of African word comparisons; IV) A list of reptiles; V) Mr. Tedlie's and Hutchinson's thermometer readings; VI) Translations of the numbers from one to ten in as many as 31 African languages. Bowdich, born in Bristol, an excellent linguist, whose "enthusiastic devotion to science cost him his life" due to taking astronomical observations after which he succumbed to a cold, then fever and never fully recovered, passing at just 33 years of age. REFERENCES: Abbey, Travel in Aquatint and Lithography, 1770-1860, 279; A.W. Cardinall, A Bibliography of the Gold Coast, 492; Gay, 2861; Robert L. Hess & Dalvan M. Coger, A Bibliography of Primary Sources for Nineteenth-Century Tropical Africa as Recorded By Explorers, Administrators, Military Men, Adventurers, and Others, Stanford, (1973), 6355; Ray Howgego, Encyclopedia of Exploration 1800-1850, C19 [does not write about Bowdich]; Sara T. Prideaux, Aquatint Engraving; a chapter in the history of book illustration, p. 238; Tooley 95. First Edition. 
Price: 2500.00 USD
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Abeokuta and the Camaroons Mountains. An Exploration., BURTON, Sir Richard F.
4 BURTON, Sir Richard F. Abeokuta and the Camaroons Mountains. An Exploration.
London: Tinsley Brothers, 1863. 1863 
2 volumes. 8vo. xvi, 333, [1], [2]; v, 306, [2] pp. Vol. I: Original photographic mounted photo as frontispiece plate, 1 plate (facing p. 149); vol. II: frontispiece engraving, folding map of “The Camaroons Mountains”, 2 plates (facing pp. 128, 136). Total plates: 4. Ads included at rear of both vols. Partly unopened. Original blind-embossed dark green cloth, neatly rebacked with matching cloth and with original back-strips mounted to restore the original binding as fine as possible, retains original endleaves; upper corner dented (v. I). Very good +. First edition. Burton wrote this two-volume work, first published in 1863, while working as the British consul in Fernando Po (modern-day Equatorial Guinea), West African coast. The area is known as “the white man’s grave” [referring to the high mortality rate among white missionaries and colonists in Africa, due to the tropical climate, diseases, and sanitation]. Burton describes his journey to Abeokuta, the capital of the Egba tribe of the Yoruba nation (which was located in the south-west of present-day Nigeria). Burton gives detailed descriptions of the people he meets – including the king – and considers the relationship between the Egba and England in the context of British ambitions in West Africa. Burton tells of his expedition to the mountains on the Cameroon coast, where he climbed Mount Cameroon, an active volcano. Perhaps his most important contribution is his description of the native condition of Africans, their character, description, societal conditions, attitudes, etc. “… he abhorred West African Creole culture, regarding it as no more than an inauthentic, offensive, comic mimicry of its British counterpart. As ever, Burton’s opinions of early abolitionist hopes and policies.” – See: T.C. McCaskie, “Cultural Encounters: Britain and Africa,” within: Andrew Porter, (ed.), The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The ... 1999, p.675. This narrative also includes extensive appendices, being lists of plants collected on his expeditions, notes about the wildlife living in the mountains, and meteorological observations about the climate and temperature of the region. “The forest swarmed with ‘tigers,’ hyaenas, and other bugbears, the fevers were mortal in the lower regions, the cold would be intense, snow having just been seen in the upper heights, and the Krumen – the only servants in these regions – would certainly die or desert, perhaps do both.” v. II, pp. 69-70. Casada 25; Penzer p. 70. First Edition. 
Price: 1400.00 USD
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First Footsteps in East Africa; or, an exploration of Harar., BURTON, Sir Richard F.
5 BURTON, Sir Richard F. First Footsteps in East Africa; or, an exploration of Harar.
London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1856. 1856 Signed
8vo. xl, 590, [595]-648 pp. 2 engraved maps, 4 chromolithographed plates, 7 figs., index. Early navy blue gilt-stamped calf, brownish/red spine label, all edges marbled. Bookseller’s labels: R.J. Bush, 32 Charing Cross; Jake Zeitlin, Los Angeles [ca. 1932]. Inscribed: “Arthur Vickris Pryor with the best wishes of his friend Edmond L. Hanbury, on his leaving Eton, Election 1864.” FIRST EDITION. The appendix skips section IV as usual, due to its discussion of female circumcision, and thus omitted during the print run. PROVENANCE: Pryor and Hanbury owned a brewery in England: Inscribed: “Arthur Vickris Pryor with the best wishes of his friend Edmond L. Hanbury, on his leaving Eton, Election 1864.” Arthur Vickris Pryor, JP, DL, Leics (1846-1927), 1s. Arthur, of Wandsworth, Surrey, arm. CHRIST CHURCH, matric. 18 May, 1864, aged 17; B.A. 1867, a partner in Truman and Hanbury’s brewery. See Eton School Lists. From Foster, Joseph. Alumni Oxonienses: The Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886 and Alumni Oxonienses: The Members of the University of Oxford, 1500-1714. Oxford: Parker and Co., 1888-1892 (ancestry.com). Robert Pryor and his brother Thomas Marlborough Pryor were members of a family which ran a brewery and malting operation in Baldock, in Hertfordshire. “On July 10 1866 the Brick Lane brewery was visited by the 25-year-old Prince of Wales, who was met by a delegation of three Hanburys, three Buxtons, one Pryor, the brewery manager, Alexander Fraser, and Henry Villebois, who still owned a substantial slice of the business, as the great-great grandson of Sir Benjamin Truman.” – “When Brick Lane was home to the biggest brewery in the world,” by Martyn Cornell, 2013. Penzer pp. 60-63. First Edition. 
Price: 2000.00 USD
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Wanderings in West Africa from Liverpool to Fernando Po. By a F.R.G.S., BURTON, Sir Richard F.
6 BURTON, Sir Richard F. Wanderings in West Africa from Liverpool to Fernando Po. By a F.R.G.S.
London: Tinsley Brothers, 1863. 1863 
2 volumes. Small 8vo. viii, [2], 303, [1]; [vi], 295, [1] pp. Half-titles, folding map of “The West Coast of Africa”; some edge tears. Original publisher’s dark maroon blind-stamped cloth, gilt-stamped spine titles, author cited as “R.F. Burton F.R.G.S.” on spine. Bookplates of George Merryweather. Near fine. First edition; second issue binding [with Burton’s name on the spine]. The first issue binding does include the author’s name on the spine. “This may have been a slap at the Royal Geographical Society, for Burton was at odds with the organization’s leadership at the time over the matter of the Nile’s sources. The acerbic dedication was ‘to the true friends of Africa- not the ‘Philanthropist’ or ‘Exeter Hall’.” – Casada. “Newly married and needing employment, Burton approached the Foreign Office for a consular position, hoping for the post at Damascus. Instead, he was offered the consulship at Fernando Po, a small, unhealthy island in the Bight of Biafra on the west African coast. When he accepted the position on 27 March 1861 he requested to retain his commission in the Bombay army, but he was struck from the list, thereby losing not only his half pay but also any prospect of a pension or sale of his commission, an action about which he always complained bitterly. Burton did not permit Isabel to accompany him to Fernando Po, which he described as ‘the very abomination of desolation’. He slipped away from the post at every opportunity for excursions on the African mainland or to meet Isabel in the Canaries or England. Although he loathed Fernando Po, he worked continuously at his writing with Wanderings in West Africa and Abeokuta and the Cameroons Mountains both appearing in 1863.” - DNB. Casada 70; Penzer pp. 71-72. First Edition. 
Price: 1850.00 USD
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7 ELLIS, Rev. William (1794-1872). Three Visits to Madagascar during the years 1853-1854-1856. Including a journey to the capital; with notices of the natural history of the country and of the present civilization of the people.
New York: Harper & Brothers, 1859. 1859 
8vo. xv, [1], [17]-514, [2] pp. Illustrations ["by woodcuts from photographs, etc."], Madagascar map, portraits; small hole in margin of p. xv, moderate foxing. Original full publisher's brown blind and gilt-stamped cloth; extremities worn, corners showing, upper joint loose. Good. "Appendix. Brief remarks on the Malagasy language": pp. [497]-514. This is one of several principle works on all aspects of life in Madagascar, providing insights in to life there under the reign of Queen Ranavalona I (1828-61). – J. D. Fage, John E. Flint, Roland Anthony Oliver, The Cambridge History of Africa, Volume 5, (1976), p. 524. 
Price: 50.00 USD
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8 FORBATH, Peter. The River Congo; the discovery, exploration, and exploitation of the world's most dramatic river.
New York: Harper & Row, (1977). 1977 
Book Club Edition. 24 cm. xii, 417 pp. Maps, illustrations, index. Gilt-stamped green boards, dust-jacket, map endpapers; jacket torn. Very good. 
Price: 2.95 USD
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9 GIBSON, James Young. The Story of the Zulus.
London: Longmans, Green, 1911. 1911 
New edition, revised and extended. 8vo. vii, 338, [2 ads.] pp. 11 plates including portrait frontis., based on photographs and lithographs, Zulu Genealogy, index; title off-setting from tissue, p. 259 corner creased. Original gilt-stamped double ruled teal cloth; rubbed. Otherwise very good. 
Price: 45.00 USD
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10 GRAMONT, Sanche de [aka: Ted MORGON]. The Strong Brown God, the story of the Niger River.
Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976. 1976 0395197821 / 9780395197820 
8vo. 350 pp. Maps, illustrations, bibliography, index. Gilt-stamped light brown cloth, dust-jacket, map endpapers; jacket edges rubbed. Very good. ISBN: 0395197821 
Price: 5.00 USD
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11 GUATTINI, Le P. Michele Angelo de (d.1668) [of Gattina]; Denis DE CARLI of Piacenza. A Curious and Exact Account of a Voyage to Congo, in the Years 1666-1667.
[London]: for Henry Lintot and John Osborn, [circa 1744]. 1744 
Tall 4to. 483-519 pp. Printed in two columns; light foxing. Handsomely bound in period-style half calf marbled boards, five raised bands, gilt-stamped dark leather spine label. Near fine. Extracted from: vol. 1 of Awnsham Churchill’s Collection of voyages and travels, 3rd ed., 1744-1746. The author’s account of native attire and his own views: “He only wore a clout of the bigness of a handkerchief made of palm-tree leaves, for decency sake, to cover that which modesty requires should be cover’d, and a cloke of European cloth reaching down to the ground; it was blue, a colour much esteem’d among them; the rest of his body was naked. The Blacks that attended the macolonte, and who were his officers, had only one of those handkerchiefs, which they send to be dy’d blue at Loanda: The rest of the people had only leaves of trees, and monkeys skins; and those who live in the open country, and lie under the trees, whether men or women, wear nothing at all, but go quite naked without any sense of shame.” (p. 493). He describes musical instruments (“a piece of stake, which they tie and bend like a bow, and bind to it fifteen long, dry, and empty gourds, or calabashes of several sizes, to sound several notes, with a hole at top with a little thin bit of board, somewhat lifted above the hole. Then they take a cord made of the bark of a tree, and fastening it to both ends of the instrument, hang it about their neck. To play upon it they use two sticks, the ends of which are cover’d with a bit of rag, with which they strike upon those little boards, and so make the gourds gather wind, which in some manner resembles the sound of an organ, and makes a pretty agreeable harmony, especially when three or four of them play together.” (p. 493). The author then talks of drums, beats, extraordinary birds, the colla [kola = caffeine, often chewed in Africa] nut, the death reported of Fra Michael Angelo of Gattina (p. 502) – after a prolonged and unknown sickness which was treated variously including by bleeding, anointed with oil (to lessen pain), then the swelling increased, they stopped applying the oil (for fear it made matters worse), after fifteen days he died. Another account tells of “a useful monkey” – the author being bothered by rats, and a smell by some natives, and a remedy was called “infallible … against those two inconveniences” was offered: a little monkey would protect him from rats by [the monkey] blowing on them [the rates], “when he spied them and would expel the ill scent by that of his skin, which smelt of musk…” Problems with ants, a voyage to Lisbon, and to Cadiz, a sea-battle of a Christian ship against that of Turkish origin. More voyaging, and a report that F. Philip de Galesia, a missioner, was killed and eaten by “Blacks”. “Dionigi da Palacenza Carli was a Capuchin missionary in Africa, in the seventeenth century. He was one of a band of Franciscan friars of the Capuchin Reform, sent out to the Congo in 1666. One of his companions was Padre Michele Angelo Guattini da Rhegio, who wrote an account of the voyage of the missionaries from Genoa to Lisbon and thence to Brazil, Loanda, and the Congo, that being the route the missionaries had to take to get to their destination. Padre Michele Angelo died shortly after his arrival in the Conga, leaving his manuscript in the hands of Dionigi Carli, who, on his return to Italy a few years afterwards owing to sickness, wrote an account of his own experiences in the Congo and on his homeward journey. Carli gives a detailed description of the manners and customs of the natives and of the doings of the missionaries. He tells how the friars died in numbers, owing to the climate, and speaks with discouragement of the peculiar difficulties of the situation. He trusts that some of the 2700 children he baptized will reach Heaven and be to his credit as a missionary in the judgment book of God. Finally he gives some account of the various cities he passed through in Portugal, Spain, and France on his way home. Carli published at Rhegio in 1672 his own work together with that of Guattini under the title: “Il Moro transportato in Venezia ovvero curioso raconto de’ Costumi, Riti et Religione de’ Populi dell’ Africa, America, Asia ed Europa”. A second edition appeared at Bologna in 1674. An English translation is published in Churchill, “Voyages” (London, 1704), I.” (Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913). Michael Graves-Johnston, a British bookseller wrote a paper, “Early Africa Travel Literature”, identify the English translations as part of “Churchill’s Collection of Voyages and Travels of 1704 as A Curious and Exact Account of a Voyage to the Congo in the years 1666 and 1667. In the same volume was the work of another Capuchin; Father Jerome Merolla da Sorrento entitled A Voyage to Congo, and several other countries chiefly in Southern-Africk, in the year 1682.” – ABAA.org. 
Price: 750.00 USD
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12 JACKSON, George Anson. Algiers: being a complete picture of the Barbary States, their government, laws, religion, and natural productions, and containing a sketch of their various revolutions, a description of the domestic manners and customs of the Moors, Arabs, and Turks, an account of the four great capitals of Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, and Morocco, and a narrative of the various attacks upon Algiers, by the European states; including a faithful detail of the late glorious victory of Lord Exmouth.
London: R. Edwards, 1817. 1817 
Small 4to. iv, [2], 411, [1] pp. Folding color map (frontispiece), decorative title woodcut border, 9 hand-colored plates; some offsetting of plates. Modern gorgeous half gilt-stamped black calf over dark marbled, new endpapers. Fine. FIRST AND ONLY EDITION of this fascinating study of North Africa by G. A. Jackson (unknown in biographical literature). He describes the inhabitants (Berbers, Arabs, Moors, Turks, Muslims and Jews of the Barbary States) and the many aspects of their customs and manners including details of daily life, the way they dress, their history, religion, etc. Of particular interest is his accounts of slavery in such areas as Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and New Sallé. His interviews of captured Christians and a seamen who were made slaves, and their cruel treatment, especially in the midst of the normal, daily events of the city. // Abbey Travel 300; William Gallois, A History of Violence in the Early Algerian Colony, Macmillan, 2013; Thomas K. Park, ?Aomar Boum, Historical Dictionary of Morocco, Scarecrow Press, 2006, p. 556; Gillian Weiss, Captives and Corsairs: France and Slavery in the Early Modern Mediterranean, Stanford University Press, (2011), Pages, 151, 316. 
Price: 3000.00 USD
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13 JACKSON, George Anson. Algiers: being a complete picture of the Barbary States, their government, laws, religion, and natural productions, and containing a sketch of their various revolutions, a description of the domestic manners and customs of the Moors, Arabs, and Turks, an account of the four great capitals of Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, and Morocco, and a narrative of the various attacks upon Algiers, by the European states; including a faithful detail of the late glorious victory of Lord Exmouth.
London: R. Edwards, 1817. 1817 
Small 4to. iv, [2], 411, [1] pp. FOLDING COLOR FRONTISPIECE MAP, DECORATIVE TITLE WOODCUT BORDER, 9 HAND-COLORED PLATES; SOME OFFSETTING OF PLATES. Gorgeous modern half gilt-stamped black calf over dark marbled, new endpapers. Fine. FIRST AND ONLY EDITION of this fascinating study of North Africa by George Anson Jackson. He describes the inhabitants of Algiers: Berbers, Arabs, Moors, Turks, Muslims and Hebrews of the Barbary States, and the many aspects of their customs and manners including details of daily life, their dress, history, religion, etc. Of particular interest are his accounts of slavery in such areas as Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and New Sallé. The narrative includes interviews of captured Christians, including a seaman, who were made slaves, describing their cruel treatment, especially in the midst of the normal, daily events of the city. Abbey Travel 300. See: William Gallois, A History of Violence in the Early Algerian Colony, Macmillan, 2013, (p. 193); Thomas K. Park, ?Aomar Boum, Historical Dictionary of Morocco, Scarecrow Press, 2006, p. 556; Gillian Weiss, Captives and Corsairs: France and Slavery in the Early Modern Mediterranean, Stanford University Press, (2011), Pages, 151, 316. 
Price: 2500.00 USD
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14 MEROLLA da Sorrento, Jerom [Girolamo]. A Voyage to Congo, and several other Countries chiefly in Southern Africk. By Father Jerom Merolla da Sorrento, a Capuchin and Apostolick Missioner in the year 1682. Made English from the Italian.
[London]: for Henry Lintot and John Osborn, [1744?]. 1744 
Tall 4to. 521-616 pp. Printed in two columns; light foxing. Handsomely bound in period-style half calf marbled boards, five raised bands, gilt-stamped dark leather spine label. Near fine. THIS AN IMPORTANT WORK ON THE EARLY EXPLORATION FOR CONGO, a translation of Breve e succinta relatione del viaggio nel regno di Congo. Extracted from: vol. 1 of Awnsham Churchill’s Collection of voyages and travels, 3rd ed., 1744-1746. Includes a single-leaf table of words from the Congo language “Conghese” – such as, “Cariabemba” = the devil, “Cacazumbu” = wizard, and “Pompero” a buyer of slaves, etc. The journey begins in Brazil and crosses the Atlantic to the Congo and Ethiopia. Brazil, as mentioned, being where the voyage started, the text relates of some international trade, as Portuguese ships export tobacco and sugars, “To uphold the sugar-works a vast number of slaves is required as well to plant and cultivate the canes, as to provide sufficient fuel for the prodigious furnaces that are employed both night and day: Some there are who have no less than five hundred slave for this purpose, and whose labour is so hard, and their sustenance so small, that they are reckoned to live long if they hold out seven years.” (p. 529). The text mentions fruits and spices: figs [“which Arabs and Persians call mouz” p.530] – “one leaf whereof serves for a table-cloth at a feast”, nicesi, candied citron-peel, cinnamon, of apes and “monkies” – for importing [“they are called sagoris, or sagorini, are no bigger than dormice, and are kept in cotton in muffs…”], sharks, birds, monsters (p. 535) – not specifically described, but seemingly human, at port to repair damage to a ship – the writer makes a tale of collecting an unknown herb by these “sea-monsters” and “carrying them ashore.” One can only wonder at what is being said here … “It’s a nice coincidence that printing with movable type was being introduced in the same century as European travellers were setting out to explore Africa and the New World. The three areas first discovered and hence written about in sub-Saharan Africa were west Africa – the Guinea coast; the Congo… literary interest was still taking place in the Congo region…. Michael Angelo and Denis de Carli, again both Capuchin missionaries were writing of their experiences. These were translated into English and published as part of Churchill’s Collection of Voyages and Travels of 1704 as A Curious and Exact Account of a Voyage to the Congo in the years 1666 and 1667. In the same volume was the work of another Capuchin; Father Jerome Merolla da Sorrento entitled A Voyage to Congo, and several other countries chiefly in Southern-Africk, in the year 1682.” – Michael Graves-Johnston, bookseller, 2002, revised 2010, “Early African Literature,” – ABAA.org. 
Price: 800.00 USD
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15 SNOWBALL, George J. (ed.). Science and Medicine in Central Africa: Proceedings of the Central African Scientific and Medical Congress. Held at The College of Further Education Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia 26-30 August 1963.
Oxford, et al.: Pergamon Press, (1965). 1965 
FIRST EDITION. Thick 8vo. xxvii, 980 pp. Fold-outs, photos, illustrations, figs., tables, indexes; small inked correction on title. Green cloth, silver stamped cover and spine titles, original plastic wrapper; inner hinge a bit cracked, small pieces of tape on wrapper and front free endpaper. Very good. First Edition. 
Price: 80.00 USD
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16 WILLIS, Bailey. East African plateaus and rift valleys.
Washington: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1936. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication No. 470. At head of title: Studies in 1936 
Washington:: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1936. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication No. 470. At head of title: Studies in Comparative Seismology., 1936. 296 x 235 mm. 4to. x, 358 pp. Color frontis., 72 plates, 16 figs., tables, bibliog., index. Gilt-stamped dark green cloth; lightly rubbed, corners bumped. Ex library spine label removed, rubber stamps, label in front paste-down removed. Very good. 
Price: 200.00 USD
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